Interstate-Guide Home State by State Interstate list Main Interstate Routes Hidden Interstates Decommissioned Interstates Future Interstates Business Loops & Spurs Interstates Facts & Trivia FWHA Rouge Log Kurumi's 3di Log
 

Interstate 276 Pennsylvania

 

Routing

Interstate 276 is the Pennsylvania Turnpike serving the northern portion of the Philadelphia metropolitan area. The Interstate begins where Interstate 76 splits from the turnpike towards central Philadelphia. The eastern terminus is at the Pennsylvania-New Jersey state line over the Delaware River bridge. Interstate 276 does not extend into New Jersey.

Interstate 276, the easternmost leg of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, has only six overall interchanges, but a seventh will be added at Interstate 95 by 2008 (in addition to the EZ Pass Only interchange at Virginia Drive).

Future Aspirations

By 2008, the eastern terminus for Interstate 276 will shift. It will move west to the point where Interstate 276 crosses over Interstate 95 near Bristol. This is prior to the Delaware River and New Jersey state line. This is the location of a future high-speed interchange between Interstates 95 and 276. Interstate 95 will take over existing Interstate 276 east from this point, continuing across the river via the New Jersey Turnpike Extension to connect to the New Jersey Turnpike. Construction of the new interchange and toll plaza is planned to begin in early 2007, with completion expected in 2008. The bridge over the Delaware River will also be twinned by 2016. North of Exit 6, the New Jersey Turnpike is already designated as Interstate 95. At the time this change is completed, Interstate 95 north of Bristol will become part of Interstate 295. For more information, visit Pennsylvania Turnpike/Interstate 95 Connection.1, 2

The westernmost section of Interstate 276 is being widened to six lanes as part of the Six Lane Widening Project. This project provides for widening the original turnpike to six lanes between Interstate 76 at Valley Forge (Exit 326) and Interstate 476 at Plymouth Meeting (Exit 334); a new Schuylkill River Bridge with six lanes is part of this project. The timeframe of construction is between 1998 and 2008 over a series of phases.3

History

This section of the Pennsylvania Turnpike was built between 1952 and 1954, with the turnpike's eastern extension groundbreaking on November 20, 1952 and opening to traffic all the way to the Delaware Valley Interchange on November 17, 1954. The Delaware River Bridge, which was a joint project between Pennsylvania and New Jersey, broke ground on June 22, 1954, and opened to traffic on May 23, 1956.2 At the time, this section of the Pennsylvania Turnpike was originally signed as Interstate 80S. As a result, Interstate 276 was signed as Interstate 280 from 1954 until 1963, which was when Interstate 80S east of Pittsburgh was renumbered as Interstate 76.

Highway Guides

Western Terminus - Interstate 76 - King of Prussia, Pennsylvania
Perspective from Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike west
The final interchange of Interstate 276 westbound represents the Interstate 76 switch from the Schuylkill Expressway onto the Pennsylvania Turnpike. The Exit 326 (Valley Forge Interchange) also serves nearby U.S. 202 and 422 for West Chester (pop. 17,873), Pottstown (pop. 21,771), and King of Prussia (pop. 18,539). Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
A close look at the one-mile guide sign for the Valley Forge Interchange. Interstate 76 travels the Schuylkill Expressway southeast from Valley Forge and King of Prussia to Conshohocken (pop. 7,589) and the city of Philadelphia before crossing the Delaware River via the Walt Whitman Bridge. The first interchange of the Schuylkill Expressway occurs with U.S. 202 adjacent to the King of Prussia Mall. That junction saw major reconstruction in 2001-03 as did the northernmost segment of the U.S. 202 freeway between Interstate 76 and West Chester. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
The final stretch of Interstate 276 westbound expands to four lanes ahead of the Exit 326 off-ramp for Interstate 76 east. Original signs posted here included a "TO" in front of Interstate 476 as the connection between the Mid-County Expressway and Interstate 276 was unconstructed. Interstate 476 and Interstate 76 cross paths at West Conshohocken (pop. 1,446). Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Interstate 276 draws to a close as Interstate 76 westbound enters the Pennsylvania Turnpike mainline. The toll road continues westward to the capital city of Harrisburg and Steel City of Pittsburgh before crossing into the Buckeye State near Youngstown, Ohio. U.S. 202 intersects the eastern terminus of U.S. 422 (Schuylkill Expressway Extension) just west of Interstate 76 en route to West Chester and Wilmington, Delaware. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Perspective from Interstate 76/Schuylkill Expressway west
Traveling west on Interstate 76, these are the first signs advising of the pending junction with Interstate 276 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike. The interchange with the turnpike comes immediately after the junction with U.S. 202 and U.S. 422 near Valley Forge. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
Recently widened, the right two lanes provide the connection to Exits 328B, 328A, and 327. The left two lanes will connect onto the turnpike and thus provide access to the continuation of Interstate 76 west and to Interstate 276 east. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
Westbound Interstate 76/Schuykill Expressway reaches Exits 328B-A and 327, Junction U.S. 202 and U.S. 422. Both right lanes exit here. The left two lanes continue onto the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Compare the 2005 photo with one from 2001, which shows the completed expansion project for the expressway approach to the turnpike and U.S. 202-422. Check out the replacement railroad bridge! This interchange marks the eastern terminus of U.S. 422, a freeway that extends west toward Pottstown and Reading. The U.S. 202 freeway travels east and south toward West Chester. Photos taken by AARoads (08/30/05) and David Field (10/01).
Prior to the reconstruction project, access to Exits 328B-A and 327 were taken directly from Interstate 76/Schuykill Expressway. With the implementation of collector-distributor lanes and the new railroad bridge, the design of this area has dramatically changed between 2001 and 2005. Photos taken by AARoads (08/30/05) and David Field (10/01).
These pictures show the collector-distributor lanes for the connections to U.S. 202 and U.S. 422 as well as Mall Boulevard. Photos taken by AARoads (08/30/05) and David Field (10/01).
The collector-distributor lanes return to Interstate 76 after Exit 327, Mall Boulevard. Traffic merges together in advance of the merge onto the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
Interstate 76/Schuykill Expressway splits, with the left two lanes continuing west on Interstate 76/Pennsylvania Turnpike and the right lane exiting to Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike east. Interstate 276 is also signed as To Interstate 476, which follows the Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike to Allentown and Scranton. Notice the Pennsylvania 9 shield partially covered by the Interstate 476 shield. Photo taken by David Field (10/01).
Perspective from U.S. 202 south
Now traveling south on U.S. 202, the first advance signage for the interchange with the Pennsylvania Turnpike, Interstate 76, Interstate 276, and U.S. 422 is this junction sign. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (08/15/04).
The left two lanes will continue south on U.S. 202, while the right two lanes connect to the turnpike. This set of overheads is the first of two to include Interstate 276 east. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (08/15/04).
After the North Gulph Road signalized intersection, U.S. 202 south becomes a freeway. The first exit is the offramp to Interstate 76 west to Harrisburg and Interstate 276 east to New Jersey via the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (08/15/04).
Shortly thereafter, the right two lanes prepare to exit to Interstate 76/Schuylkill Expressway southeast to Philadelphia and U.S. 422 east to Pottstown. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (08/15/04).
Perspective from Interstate 76/Pennsylvania Turnpike east
The first signage for the Interstate 276 interchange appears on this upcoming exits sign posted on Interstate 76/Pennsylvania Turnpike east. This sign is posted just after the southern terminus of Interstate 176 near Morgantown and lists Downingtown (Exit 312, Junction Pennsylvania 100) at 13 miles and Valley Forge (Exit 326, Junction Interstate 76 and Interstate 276) at 27 miles. Photo taken by Chris Lokken and Amber Mason (06/24/08).
Shortly after the Pennsylvania 100/Downingtown interchange (Exit 312) on Interstate 76 east/Pennsylvania Turnpike, this mileage sign greets motorists to provide the distance to Valley Forge (Interstate 76 east's departure from the Turnpike/beginning of Interstate 276 at Exit 326) in 13 miles. Norristown (Interstate 276's interchange with Interstate 476/Northeast Extension of the Pennsylvania Turnpike) is in 20 miles. Photo taken by Chris Lokken and Amber Mason (06/24/08).
The first standalone sign for Exit 326 is this two-mile guide sign for Interstate 76 east's departure from the Pennsylvania Turnpike and the beginning of Interstate 276. Oddly, Interstate 276 is not mentioned on this sign, but U.S. 202 and Interstate 476 (south) are mentioned. Photo taken by Chris Lokken and Amber Mason (06/24/08).
A one-mile guide sign for Interstate 76 east's departure from the Pennsylvania Turnpike (the Valley Forge interchange) is posted soon thereafter. This sign also reminds traffic to use Exit 326 to U.S. 202 north to Norristown; U.S. 202 south to West Chester and Wilmington, Delaware; and Interstate 476/Blue Route south to Chester. To Valley Forge National Historical Park, use U.S. 202 south. Photo taken by Chris Lokken and Amber Mason (06/24/08).
Eastbound Interstate 76 and Interstate 276 split at Exit 326. Oddly, Interstate 276 is still not mentioned on the overhead sign! The pull-through sign, which originally had an Interstate 276 east shield now inexplicably features a New Jersey Turnpike shield. While the Pennsylvania Turnpike indeed travels east over the Delaware River to link with the New Jersey Turnpike (with the Delaware River bridge and Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension into New Jersey part of Future Interstate 95), the Pennsylvania Turnpike still has another 32 miles to the last Pennsylvania in terchange (Exit 352, Junction Pennsylvania 413 to Bristol). It seems like the Interstate 276 designation would take priority here. Note that this section of the Pennsylvania Turnpike was under construction as of June 2008; perhaps the signage was modified temporarily due to the project. Photo taken by Chris Lokken and Amber Mason (06/24/08).
After splitting with Interstate 276, this Interstate 76 reassurance shield is posted on the transition ramp away from the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Interstate 276 continues east along the Turnpike (visible to the left in this photo). Interstate 76 east drops down onto the Schuylkill Expressway to serve downtown Philadelphia. Photo taken by Chris Lokken and Amber Mason (06/24/08).
Perspective from Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike east
Shortly after the split from Interstate 76, eastbound Interstate 276 briefly has four through lanes before it reduces to three lanes. This area has been under construction due to the six-lane project currently underway. There is no first reassurance shield for Interstate 276 until after Pennsylvania 611 (Exit 343). Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
Eastern Terminus - New Jersey-Pennsylvania State Line* (Delaware River Bridge) (Future: Interstate 95) - Bristol, Pennsylvania
Perspective from Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike east
Traveling east on Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike, this mileage sign provides the distance to the last exit in Pennsylvania (Exit 358, Junction U.S. 13/Bristol Pike) and the New Jersey State Line at the Delaware River bridge. It is located immediately after the Neshaminy Service Plaza near Milepost 352. As part of mainline improvements associated with the Interstate 95 project, a new mainline toll barrier is planned to be built just east of the service plaza in this general vicinity. Once this barrier is built, the proposed high-speed connection between Interstate 95 and Interstate 276 could be made without a toll barrier. Since the existing toll plaza at the Delaware River bridge would remain in use, travelers would find a toll plaza in either direction from the future Interstate 95/Interstate 276 interchange.1, 2 Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
The next exit along Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike east is Exit 358, Junction U.S. 13/Bristol Pike. This sign is located two miles west of the interchange; the first overpass in the distance carries New Falls Road over Interstate 276, and the second overpass (barely visible) carries Interstate 95 over the turnpike. A new interchange is being constructed at Interstate 95, and once it is complete in 2008, Interstate 276 will end at that point. So for now, this particular photo shows the future eastern terminus of Interstate 276. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
Eastbound Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike approaches Exit 358, Junction U.S. 13/Bristol Pike, one mile. This sign is located after the point where Interstate 95/Delaware Expressway passes over Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike. After the freeway interchange is constructed, this section of Interstate 276 will be transferred to Interstate 95. However, full completion of the Interstate 95 connection includes not just the interchange but also a parallel span for the Delaware River Bridge and other capacity improvements to the corridor between here and the New Jersey Turnpike by 2016. It is unlikely that this section will remain only four lanes (two lanes each way) once those improvements are complete. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
The final interchange along eastbound Interstate 276 is Exit 358, Junction U.S. 13/Bristol Pike. Follow U.S. 13 south to Philadelphia via Bristol Pike and Frankford Avenue once within the city limits. To the north, U.S. 13 only has a short distance until it terminates at U.S. 1 near Fallingston and Morrisville, on the Pennsylvania side of Trenton, the capital city of New Jersey. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
For the interchange with U.S. 13, a short access road connects Interstate 276 with U.S. 13. A trumpet interchange provides the connection at Interstate 276, and a second trumpet interchange connects to U.S. 13. A toll barrier is placed along the connecting road between U.S. 13 and Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike, which is typical of this era of toll road. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
All traffic must stop to pay the toll. Currently, this toll plaza marks the end of the ticketed Pennsylvania Turnpike system. For the first time, the tied through arch bridge that spans the Delaware River comes into view on eastbound Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
Leaving the toll booth, Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike east prepares to ascend the Delaware River Bridge. Rising to 135 feet above the level of the river, a tied arch bridge was built between 1954 and 1956 to connect the Pennsylvania Turnpike to the New Jersey Turnpike. This cooperative effort allows eastbound motorists to connect directly onto the north-south toll freeway en route to New York City and New England. In this photo, note the black variable message sign -- it is New Jersey-standard, with only a finite number of suggestions. The top part of the sign, when illuminated, reads "reduce speed" various conditions (fog, accident ahead, Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
Prior to ascending the Delaware River Bridge is a black variable message sign -- New Jersey-standard. These signs have only a finite number of messages, but all of them are relevant and should be heeded when lit. The top part of the sign, when illuminated, reads "reduce speed." The bottom part of the sign advises of various adverse conditions, such as construction, accident, fog, ice, or snow. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
The speed limit on Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike is variable depending upon conditions. On this day, the speed limit was set at 50 miles per hour. A limited sight distance, narrow lanes, and nonexistent left shoulder all contribute to the reduced speed limit. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
Now ascending the bridge, the grade to the highest point is rather steep. The state line between Pennsylvania and New Jersey is roughly at the center line of the river, so Interstate 276 ends at the point where the turnpike crosses into New Jersey. Most motorists do not notice a change at all, since the freeway continues all the way to the New Jersey Turnpike. Additionally, there are no END shields for Interstate 276. Finally, there are Interstate 95 reassurance shields in the center median once the turnpike enters New Jersey. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
These photos show the superstructure of the bridge as seen eastbound, where Interstate 276 ends. The proposed new Delaware River Bridge, which is planned to open in 2016, would be located to the south of the existing bridge. That would make the current bridge into a westbound-only bridge, while the new bridge would carry eastbound traffic. The plan would have three lanes of through traffic on each bridge with full shoulders. There are no END shields for Interstate 276. Photos taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
Perspective from Interstate 95 north/Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension east
Now descending the bridge, Interstate 276 has ended and Interstate 95 has begun. At this time, there are two sections of extant Interstate 95 in New Jersey: the orphaned section northwest of Trenton and the New Jersey Turnpike section, which begins here. Designating this section as Interstate 95 without completion of the interchange with the Delaware Expressway makes Interstate 95 discontinuous. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
The only interchange on Interstate 95 north/Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension is Exit 6A, Junction U.S. 130 to Burlington, Florence, and Bordentown. The freeway widens to three lanes in each direction. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
A Welcome to New Jersey/New Jersey Turnpike sign is posted on northbound Interstate 95/Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension prior to Exit 6A, Junction U.S. 130. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
Northbound Interstate 95/Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension reaches Exit 6A, Junction U.S. 130. The Exit 6A signage was replaced at the same time these overhead signs were replaced. A toll booth lies ahead, just after the U.S. 130 junction. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
The ticketed system of toll collection resumes here, when all motorists are given a ticket. Shortly after this toll plaza, Interstate 95 north will transition onto the mainline New Jersey Turnpike. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
To Camden via the New Jersey Turnpike south, stay left. To Trenton and New York City via the New Jersey Turnpike north, stay right. Although not signed here, Interstate 95 transitions onto northbound New Jersey Turnpike. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
The left three lanes all transition onto northbound Interstate 95/New Jersey Turnpike to New York City. The right lane has an exit to the New Jersey Turnpike southbound to Camden. Interstate 276 does not extend this far east; however, it is signed from both directions of the New Jersey Turnpike for purposes of continuity and clarity. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).
Perspective from New Jersey Turnpike north
Now traveling north on the New Jersey Turnpike, the Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension connects the New Jersey Turnpike with the Pennsylvania Turnpike mainline via Exit 6 (two miles). Photo taken by Alex Nitzman and Justin Cozart (06/13/05).
Now traveling north on the New Jersey Turnpike, the Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension connects the New Jersey Turnpike with the Pennsylvania Turnpike mainline via Exit 6. The Pennsylvania Turnpike is signed as Interstate 276, which implies that Interstate 276 extends as far east as the New Jersey Turnpike. However, until the Interstate 95 connection project at Bristol is completed, Interstate 276 ends at the state line. It would be more appropriate to sign this exit as Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension west to Interstate 276 west. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman and Carter Buchanan (06/26/05).
U.S. 130, which parallels the New Jersey Turnpike (New Jersey 700) and Interstate 295, is connected to the turnpike via Exit 6. The right lane provides a flyover connection to Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike west. Once Interstate 95 is extended over the Delaware River Bridge to the New Jersey Turnpike, this sign will be changed accordingly. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman and Carter Buchanan (06/26/05).
Northbound New Jersey Turnpike reaches Exit 6, Junction Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension west to Interstate 276. From this point northward, the New Jersey Turnpike is also signed as Interstate 95. The routes remain on a shared alignment all the way north to the junction with Interstate 80 in Ridgefield Park. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman and Justin Cozart (06/13/05).
Perspective from Interstate 95/New Jersey Turnpike south
Now traveling south on Interstate 95/New Jersey Turnpike, the Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension/To Interstate 276 connects the New Jersey Turnpike with the Pennsylvania Turnpike mainline via Exit 6 (1.5 miles). Photo taken by Carter Buchanan (06/30/05).
The Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension will eventually connect Interstate 95 from its New Jersey Turnpike alignment onto its existing alignment in Pennsylvania. For now, Interstate 95 disappears at Exit 6, and the remainder of the New Jersey Turnpike is signed as "To Interstate 95" to the Delaware Memorial Bridge, which is also Interstate 295. Photo taken by Carter Buchanan (06/30/05).
Southbound Interstate 95/New Jersey Turnpike approaches Exit 6, Junction Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension to Interstate 276 and Junction U.S. 130. To continue south on Interstate 95, either continue south along New Jersey Turnpike or use Interstate 276 west to U.S. 13 (Exit 358) to Interstate 95 in Pennsylvania. Photo taken by Carter Buchanan (06/30/05).
The New Jersey Turnpike and Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension split here at Exit 6. This kind of signage is becoming more and more rare; it was common at one time along the New Jersey Turnpike. Follow the Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension west to Interstate 276; the New Jersey Turnpike transitions onto unsigned New Jersey 700 for the rest of the way south to the Delaware Memorial Bridge. Photo taken by Carter Buchanan (06/30/05).
Interstate 95 south/Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension west
Interstate 95 (Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension) southbound crosses underneath Interstate 295 two miles east of the U.S. 130 Florence interchange. There is no direct access between Interstate 95 and 295 but drivers bound for the east Philadelphia bypass can access the freeway via U.S. 130 and Florence Columbus Road. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Old York Road and Florence Columbus Roads cross over the Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension just east of the New Jersey Turnpike system toll plaza and U.S. 130 trumpet interchange. Motorists exit the ticketed system of the turnpike before intersecting U.S. 130 at Roebling. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
The New Jersey Turnpike toll plaza on Interstate 95 southbound as it approaches U.S. 130 and the Delaware River Bridge. Another toll plaza, for the Pennsylvania Turnpike System, resides just west of the Delaware River crossing. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Four lanes of the Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension westbound depart the toll plaza. Two overall continue into Pennsylvania beyond the U.S. 130 off-ramp for Florence and Bordentown. U.S. 130 travels southward to Stevens, Burlington, Willingboro, Delran, and Cinnminson toward Camden. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Interstate 95 southbound narrows to two lanes through the U.S. 130 trumpet interchange. A pair of toll booths feature a coin drop for the Delaware River Bridge into Bristol, Pennsylvania for U.S. 130 oncoming motorists. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Ascending the westbound approach to the Delaware River Bridge on the Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension westbound. Two miles separate the state line from the Exit 358 interchange with U.S. 13 at Bristol. Interstate 276 begins 4.5 miles west at the Pennsylvania Turnpike crossing of Interstate 95 at Midway. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Midspan on the Delaware River Bridge on the Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension as it enters the Keystone State. The state line lines the midpoint of the Delaware River. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Interstate 95 south/Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension west
The Pennsylvania Turnpike westbound as it enters the mainline toll plaza that begins the ticket system of the tolled highway network. A button copy overhead proclaims the highway is the Pennsylvania Turnpike ahead of the Bristol area plaza. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Interstate 276 westbound begins beyond the toll plaza at the nearby Bristol interchange (Exit 353) with U.S. 13 (Bristol Pike). Toll rates for the entire Pennsylvania Turnpike system went up in August 1, 2004. The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission (PTC) implemented a 1.8 cents-per-mile car increase and 5.3 cents-per-mile truck increase to cover costs to upgrade the highway. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Interstate 276 westbound begins as traffic to U.S. 13 (Bristol Pike) departs via the Exit 358 off-ramp. The exit numbering system of Interstate 276 continues the mainline mileage of the Pennsylvania Turnpike from the Interstate 76 portion between the Ohio State line and Valley Forge. U.S. 13 travels southward from its terminus at Morrisville to Levittown (pop. 53,692), Bristol (pop. 9,902), Croydon (pop. 10,045), Cornwells Heights (pop. 3,316), and Philadelphia (pop. 1,517,550). Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Welcome the Pennsylvania and the Pennsylvania Turnpike sign posted on Interstate 276 westbound at the Oxford Road overpass. The Pennsylvania Turnpike serves the metropolitan area with eight interchanges along Interstate 276. Photo taken by Alex Nitzman (03/23/04).
Future Eastern Terminus - Interstate 95 - Bristol, Pennsylvania
Perspective from Pennsylvania Turnpike Extension east
Yes, this picture is a repeat from above but is the best we have of the future Interstate 95 interchange. Eastbound Interstate 276/Pennsylvania Turnpike approaches Exit 358, Junction U.S. 13/Bristol Pike. This sign is located two miles west of the U.S. 13 interchange; the first overpass in the distance carries New Falls Road over Interstate 276, and the second overpass (barely visible) carries Interstate 95 over the turnpike. A new interchange is being constructed at Interstate 95, and once it is complete in 2008, Interstate 276 will end at that point. So for now, this particular photo shows the future eastern terminus of Interstate 276. Photo taken by AARoads (08/30/05).

Sources:

Page Updated August 10, 2008.

 
Mileage

State Pennsylvania
Mileage 32.65*
Cities Philadelphia, King of Prussia, Morristown
Junctions Interstate 76, Interstate 476, Interstate 95
* NOTE: Interstate 276 will be retracted to the future Interstate 95 interchange near Pennsylvania 413 once the Interstate 95/276 interchange is complete.
Source: October 31, 2002 Interstate Route Log and Finders List
Interstate 276 Annual Average Daily Traffic

County From: To: AADT Composite
Montgomery Exit 326/ Interstate 76 Exit 333/ Germantown Pike 63,000
Montgomery Exit 333/ Germantown Pike Exit 333/ Interstate 476 91,000
Montgomery Exit 333/ Interstate 476 Exit 339/ PA 309 Fort Washington 114,000
Montgomery Exit 339/ PA 309 Fort Washington Exit 343/ PA 611 Willow Grove 102,000
Montgomery/ Bucks Exit 343/ PA 611 Willow Grove Exit 351/ U.S. 1 Philadelphia 90,000
Bucks Exit 351/ U.S. 1 Philadelphia Exit 358/ U.S. 13 Bristol 44,000
Bucks Exit 358/ U.S. 13 Bristol NJ State line 40,000
Source: Pennsylvania Traffic Volumes 2002 (Penndot)

| Home | Sitemap | Updates | About | Privacy | Contact | Copyright AARoads